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Media Hub: Olympic and Paralympic Games Paris 2024

Media Hub: Olympic Games Paris 2024


The 2024 U.S. Olympic Fencing Team (Photo by Serge Timacheff/USA Fencing)

What's Included Here?

Welcome to the media hub for USA Fencing at the Olympic and Paralympic Games Paris 2024. We'll update this page regularly with photos, results, quotes and other info useful for your coverage of fencing in Paris!

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Press Conference: July 24

Olympics-credentialed media are invited to the USA Fencing Press Conference, held at 4 p.m. (Paris time) July 24 at the Main Press Center.

4 p.m. July 24

Main Press Center (Address: Palais des Congres de Paris 2 Place de la Porte Maillot 75017 Paris)

Le Rhone Room

Expected attendees:

  • Lee Kiefer, Women’s Foil
  • Jackie Dubrovich, Women’s Foil
  • Nick Itkin, Men’s Foil
  • Gerek Meinhardt, Men’s Foil
  • Miles Chamley-Watson, Men’s Foil
  • Elizabeth Tartakovsky, Women’s Saber
  • Magda Skarbonkiewicz, Women’s Saber
  • Maia Chamberlain, Women’s Saber

General Information

Fencing 101

Fencing is a strategic combat sport where opponents face off with swords in a defined area, aiming to score points by hitting specific target areas on each other's bodies. The sport involves quick movement, precise blade work, and strategic thinking to outmaneuver opponents while following strict rules of engagement. Fencing — often called "physical chess" — combines athleticism with tactical finesse for a thrilling battle of skill and strategy.

The Olympics and Paralympics feature three fencing disciplines — Epee, Foil and Saber — each with a distinct weapon and set of rules.

Learn more on the NBC Olympics site.

Olympic Games Fencing Events

In the Olympic Games, Team USA will compete in the following 10 events:

  • Women's Epee (Team and Individual)
  • Men's Saber (Team and Individual)
  • Women's Foil (Team and Individual)
  • Women's Saber (Team and Individual)
  • Men's Foil (Team and Individual)

Competition Information

About the Three Weapons

Epee

Target Area: The entire body from head to toe. 

Scoring: Points are scored with the tip of the weapon, allowing both fencers to score simultaneously. 

The epee (pronounced "EPP‐pay"), the descendant of the dueling sword, is similar in length to the foil, but is heavier, weighing approximately 27 ounces, with a larger guard (to protect the hand from a valid hit) and a much stiffer blade. Touches are scored only with the point of the blade, and the entire body, head‐to‐toe, is the valid target area, imitating an actual duel. A full‐body target makes epee a competition of careful strategy and patience — wild, rash attacks are quickly punished with counter‐attacks.

Foil

Target Area: Torso

Scoring: Points are scored with the tip of the weapon on valid target areas, while maintaining "right of way."

Off-target Hits: Strikes on non-valid areas result in a white light. The referee calls “halt,” no touch is awarded, and the bout resumes from that position. 

The foil is a descendant of the light court sword used by nobility to train for duels. The foil has a flexible rectangular blade, approximately 35 inches in length and weighs less than one pound. Points are scored with the tip of the blade and must land within the torso of the body. The valid target area in foil is the torso and does not include the arms, neck, head and legs. The flexible nature of the foil blade permits the modern elite foil fencer to attack an opponent from seemingly impossible angles.

Saber

Target Area: Waist up, including arms and head. 

Scoring: Points are scored with the edge or tip of the weapon while maintaining "right of way." 

The saber is the modern version of the slashing cavalry sword, and is similar in length and weight to the foil. The major difference is the use of the blade. Saberists can score with the edge of their blade, as well as the point. The target area is from the bend of the hips (both front and back) to the top of the head, including arms. This simulates the cavalry rider on a horse. Saber is a fast, aggressive discipline, with fencers rushing their opponent from the moment the referee gives the instruction to fence.

USA Fencing Media Contacts

Olympics: Bryan Wendell

Paralympics: Nicole Kirk


Fencing at the Olympic Games Paris 2024 takes place at the 8,000-seat Grand Palais, located on the banks of the River Seine, about a mile’s walk from the Eiffel Tower. The building, which opened in 1900 for the Paris Universal Exhibition, features a glass

Olympic Games Schedule

Olympic Games Schedule

See the detailed schedule here and the broadcast schedule here.

Saturday, July 27

Women’s Epee

Athletes:
  • Anne Cebula (Brooklyn, N.Y.)
  • Hadley Husisian (Oakton, Va.)
  • Margherita Guzzi Vincenti (Hartland, Wis.)

Session Start Times:
Round of 32: 4:50 a.m. ET (10:50 a.m. Paris)
Medal Rounds: 1 p.m. ET (7 p.m. Paris)

Streaming/Broadcast:
Live on Peacock with select bouts on USA Network

Saturday, July 27

Men’s Saber

Athletes:
  • Colin Heathcock (Beijing, China)
  • Eli Dershwitz (Sherborn, Mass.)
  • Mitchell Saron (Ridgewood, N.J.)

Session Start Times:
Round of 32: 6:30 a.m. ET (12:30 p.m. Paris)
Medal Rounds: 1:50 p.m. ET (7:50 p.m. Paris)

Streaming/Broadcast:
Live on Peacock with select bouts on USA Network

Sunday, July 28

Women’s Foil

Athletes:
  • Lee Kiefer (Lexington, Ky.)
  • Lauren Scruggs (Queens, N.Y.)
  • Jackie Dubrovich (Maplewood, N.J.)

Session Start Times:
Round of 32: 4:25 a.m. ET (10:25 a.m. Paris)
Medal Rounds: 1 p.m. ET (7 p.m. Paris)

Streaming/Broadcast:
Live on Peacock with select bouts on CNBC

Monday, July 29

Women’s Saber

Athletes:
  • Elizabeth Tartakovsky (Livingston, N.J.)
  • Magda Skarbonkiewicz (Portland, Ore.)
  • Tatiana Nazlymov (Bethesda, Md.)

Session Start Times:
Round of 32: 4:25 a.m. ET (10:25 a.m. Paris)
Medal Rounds: 1 p.m. ET (7 p.m. Paris)

Streaming/Broadcast:
Live on Peacock with select bouts on E!

Monday, July 29

Men’s Foil

Athletes:
  • Alexander Massialas (San Francisco, Calif.)
  • Nick Itkin (Los Angeles, Calif.)
  • Gerek Meinhardt (Lexington, Ky.)

Session Start Times:
Round of 32: 6:05 a.m. ET (12:05 p.m. Paris)
Medal Rounds: 1:50 p.m. ET (7:50 p.m. Paris)

Streaming/Broadcast:
Live on Peacock with select bouts on E!

Tuesday, July 30

Women’s Epee Team

Athletes:
  • Anne Cebula (Brooklyn, N.Y.)
  • Hadley Husisian (Oakton, Va.)
  • Margherita Guzzi Vincenti (Hartland, Wis.)
  • Kat Holmes (Washington, D.C.)

Session Start Times:
Team Table of 8: 7:30 a.m. ET (1:30 p.m. Paris)
Bronze and Gold Medal Matches: 1:30 p.m. ET (7:30 p.m. Paris)

Streaming/Broadcast:
Live on Peacock with select bouts on USA Network and E!

Wednesday, July 31

Men’s Saber Team

Athletes:
  • Colin Heathcock (Beijing, China)
  • Eli Dershwitz (Sherborn, Mass.)
  • Mitchell Saron (Ridgewood, N.J.)
  • Filip Dolegiewicz (Park Ridge, Ill.)

Session Start Times:
Team Table of 8: 7:30 a.m. ET (1:30 p.m. Paris)
Bronze and Gold Medal Matches: 1:30 p.m. ET (7:30 p.m. Paris)

Streaming/Broadcast:
Live on Peacock with select bouts on USA Network and E!

Thursday, August 1

Women’s Foil Team

Athletes:
  • Lee Kiefer (Lexington, Ky.)
  • Lauren Scruggs (Queens, N.Y.)
  • Jackie Dubrovich (Maplewood, N.J.)
  • Maia Weintraub (Philadelphia, Pa.)

Session Start Times:
Team Table of 8: 5:50 a.m. ET (11:50 a.m. Paris)
Bronze and Gold Medal Matches: 1:10 p.m. ET (7:10 p.m. Paris)

Streaming/Broadcast:
Live on Peacock with select bouts on E!

Saturday, August 3

Women’s Saber Team

Athletes:
  • Elizabeth Tartakovsky (Livingston, N.J.)
  • Magda Skarbonkiewicz (Portland, Ore.)
  • Tatiana Nazlymov (Bethesda, Md.)
  • Maia Chamberlain (Menlo Park, Calif.)

Session Start Times:
Team Table of 8: 7 a.m. ET (1 p.m. Paris)
Bronze and Gold Medal Matches: 1 p.m. ET (7 p.m. Paris)

Streaming/Broadcast:
Live on Peacock with select bouts on E!

Sunday, August 4

Men’s Foil Team

Athletes:
  • Alexander Massialas (San Francisco, Calif.)
  • Nick Itkin (Los Angeles, Calif.)
  • Gerek Meinhardt (Lexington, Ky.)
  • Miles Chamley-Watson (Los Angeles, Calif.)

Session Start Times:
Team Table of 8: 5:50 a.m. ET (11:50 a.m. Paris)
Bronze and Gold Medal Matches: 1:10 p.m. ET (7:10 p.m. Paris)

Streaming/Broadcast:
Live on Peacock with select bouts on E!

How the Field Was Formed

The Olympic fencing competition features a selection of the world’s best athletes to ensure global representation and the highest level of competition. Here’s how the field is selected:

  • Quota Spots: There are 34 dedicated quota spots for each weapon. The first 24 spots are allocated to the three members of each of the eight qualified teams in the team event. This is how Team USA qualified the 15 athletes who will be competing in the individual events (three each in Women’s Epee, Men’s Saber, Women’s Foil, Women’s Saber and Men’s Foil).

  • World Rankings: Six additional fencers are selected based on their FIE (International Fencing Federation) world rankings. These selections are distributed across continents: two from Europe, one from the Americas, two from Asia/Oceania, and one from Africa.

  • Continental Qualifiers: Four spots are allocated through winner-takes-all continental qualifying events, with one fencer each from Europe, the Americas, Asia/Oceania, and Africa.

  • Host Nation: As the host nation, France receives six quota places, to be distributed among team and individual events, respecting the 18-member maximum for any one nation and the 37-fencer limit for each individual event.

Tournament Format

Olympic fencing is structured a little differently from other fencing tournaments.

  • Single-Elimination: The competition is a single-elimination tournament, meaning there are no preliminary pool rounds. Athletes compete in direct elimination (DE) bouts from the start.

  • Round of 64: The competition begins with the Round of 64, though many fencers receive byes directly into the Round of 32 due to the field size (34-37 fencers).

  • One Day Only: Each weapon’s entire competition is contested in a single day. For example, Women’s Foil begins at 3:30 a.m. ET on July 28 with the Round of 64 and continues through to the medal rounds, which start at 1 p.m. ET.

  • Bronze Medal Bouts: Unlike other fencing tournaments, there is no automatic tie for bronze. Fencers who lose in the semifinals compete in a separate bout for the bronze medal before the gold medal bout.

Olympic Seeding

So who fences whom? Even though rankings are locked, we won’t know until a couple of days before the tournament.

  • Based on FIE Rankings: Fencers are initially seeded according to their FIE (International Fencing Federation) world rankings. This ensures that the highest-ranked fencers do not meet in the early rounds, rewarding success throughout the season.

  • Randomized Pairings: However, the seeding process is not strictly 1 vs. 32, 2 vs. 31, and so on. Two days before the competition, a draw is conducted where pairings (1/2, 3/4, 5/6, etc.) are randomized and could potentially flip, adding an element of unpredictability.

We’ll share the matchups on our Media Hub and via social media as soon as they’re set.

U.S. Olympic Fencing Team

Women’s Epee

National coach: Natalie Dostert; National assistant coach Cedric Loiseau

Anne Cebula

Anne Cebula

Hometown: Brooklyn, N.Y.

Club(s): New York Athletic Club, New York Fencing Academy

College: Columbia

Events: Individual & Team

Number of Games: 1st

Coach(es): Sergey Danilov

Hadley Husisian

Hadley Husisian

Hometown: Oakton, Va.

Club(s): Fencers Club, Elite Fencing Academy & DC Fencers Club

College: Princeton

Events: Individual & Team

Number of Games: 1st

Coach(es): Guillermo Madrigal

Margherita Guzzi Vincenti

Margherita Guzzi Vincenti

Hometown: Hartland, Wis.

Club(s): Ataba Fencing Club

College: Penn State

Events: Individual & Team

Number of Games: 1st

Coach(es): Abbas Fadel

Kat Holmes

Kat Holmes

Hometown: Washington, D.C.

Club(s): New York Athletic Club & DC Fencers Club

College: Princeton

Events: Team

Number of Games: 3rd (2016, 2020, 2024)

Coach(es): Zoltan Dudas

Women’s Foil

National coach: Ralf Bissdorf

Lee Kiefer

Lee Kiefer

Hometown: Lexington, Ky.

Club(s): Bluegrass Fencers’ Club

College: Notre Dame

Events: Individual & Team

Number of Games: 4th (2012, 2016, 2020, 2024)

Coach(es): Amgad Khazbak

Lauren Scruggs

Lauren Scruggs

Hometown: Queens, N.Y.

Club(s): Peter Westbrook Foundation, Fencers’ Club

College: Harvard

Events: Individual & Team

Number of Games: 1st

Coach(es): Sean McClain

Jackie Dubrovich

Jackie Dubrovich

Hometown: Maplewood, N.J.

Club(s): New Jersey Fencing Alliance

College: Columbia

Events: Individual & Team

Number of Games: 2nd (2020, 2024)

Coach(es): Brian Kaneshige

Maia Weintraub

Maia Weintraub

Hometown: Philadelphia, Pa.

Club(s): Fencers Club & Fencing Academy of Philadelphia

College: Princeton

Events: Team

Number of Games: 1st

Coach(es): Mark Masters

Men’s Foil

National coach: Greg Massialas

Alexander Massialas

Alexander Massialas

Hometown: San Francisco, Calif.

Club(s): Massialas Foundation (MTeam)

College: Stanford

Events: Individual & Team

Number of Games: 4th (2012, 2016, 2020, 2024)

Coach(es): Greg Massialas

Nick Itkin

Nick Itkin

Hometown: Los Angeles, Calif.

Club(s): LA International Fencing Center

College: Notre Dame

Events: Individual & Team

Number of Games: 2nd (2020, 2024)

Coach(es): Michael Itkin

Gerek Meinhardt

Gerek Meinhardt

Hometown: Lexington, Ky.

Club(s): Massialas Foundation (M Team), Bluegrass Fencers' Club

College: Notre Dame

Events: Individual & Team

Number of Games: 5th (2008, 2012, 2016, 2020, 2024)

Coach(es): Greg Massialas, David Willette

Miles Chamley-Watson

Miles Chamley-Watson

Hometown: Los Angeles, Calif.

Club(s): LA International Fencing Center

College: Penn State

Events: Team

Number of Games: 3rd (2012, 2016, 2024)

Coach(es): Michael Itkin

Women’s Saber

National coach: Aleks Ochocki

Elizabeth Tartakovsky

Elizabeth Tartakovsky

Hometown: Livingston, N.J.

Club(s): Manhattan Fencing Center

College: Harvard

Events: Individual & Team

Number of Games: 1st

Coach(es): Yury Gelman

Magda Skarbonkiewicz

Magda Skarbonkiewicz

Hometown: Portland, Ore.

Club(s): Oregon Fencing Alliance

College: Notre Dame (committed)

Events: Individual & Team

Number of Games: 1st

Coach(es): Adam Skarbonkiewicz

Tatiana Nazlymov

Tatiana Nazlymov

Hometown: Bethesda, Md.

Club(s): Nazlymov Fencing Foundation

College: Princeton

Events: Individual & Team

Number of Games: 1st

Coach(es): Vitali Nazlymov

Maia Chamberlain

Maia Chamberlain

Hometown: Menlo Park, Calif.

Club(s): Manhattan Fencing Center

College: Princeton

Events: Team

Number of Games: 1st

Coach(es): Yury Gelman

Men’s Saber

National coach: Akhi Spencer-El

Colin Heathcock

Colin Heathcock

Hometown: Beijing, China

Club(s): Christian Bauer Academy & Manhattan Fencing Center

College: Harvard (committed)

Events: Individual & Team

Number of Games: 1st

Coach(es): Christian Bauer

Eli Dershwitz

Eli Dershwitz

Hometown: Sherborn, Mass.

Club(s): Tim Morehouse Fencing Club

College: Harvard

Events: Individual & Team

Number of Games: 3rd (2016, 2020, 2024)

Coach(es): Aleksander Ochocki

Mitchell Saron

Mitchell Saron

Hometown: Ridgewood, N.J.

Club(s): Bergen Fencing Club, New York Athletic Club

College: Harvard

Events: Individual & Team

Number of Games: 1st

Coach(es): Oleg Stetsiv

Filip Dolegiewicz

Filip Dolegiewicz

Hometown: Park Ridge, Ill.

Club(s): Midwest Fencing Club & Tim Morehouse Fencing Club

College: Harvard

Events: Team

Number of Games: 1st

Coach(es): Bart Pukal